The Schroeder Foundation is helping St. Michael’s Hospital break down barriers to health care for people experiencing homelessness.

MAP Centre for Urban Health Solutions at St. Michael’s Hospital is a world-leading research centre dedicated to creating a healthier future for everyone. Through big-picture research and street-level solutions, MAP scientists tackle complex urban health issues, many at the intersection of health and equity. A major focus – one that The Schroeder Foundation has supported over the years – is homelessness.

The Schroeder Foundation has made a major investment to pilot the Homeless Outreach Coordinator program (aka the Navigator program) and break this cycle of illness and hospital readmission. Working in the General Internal Medicine Department, Navigators get to know patients who are homeless or precariously housed while they are in hospital. After the patients are discharged, Navigators help them get to medical appointments, identify essential community health-care and social services, and find a place for patients to recover from their hospitalization. The program has proven to be highly successful, and St. Michael’s is seeking to scale up the program across the hospital and at health-care centres across the country.

And most recently, The Schroeder Foundation is helping MAP director Dr. Stephen Hwang pilot and test a lasting solution to the homelessness crisis: Beyond Housing. His team is working with governmental and community partners to create a system that matches people to housing and community support and health-care services that are tailored to each person’s needs. And to make sure those services are available for as long as the clients need them, they are setting up a long-term case management program specifically designed to promote wellness and recovery, such as trauma-based therapy, health-care navigation and community integration.

The goal is to help people exit permanently from a life of chronic homelessness and improve their overall health and well-being.

Donations can be made directly to: https://maphealth.ca/

The Schroeder Foundation is helping St. Michael’s Hospital stop “Canada’s disease” in its tracks.

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a devastating neurological disorder that affects one in 400 Canadians, the highest prevalence in the world. St. Michael’s Hospital – a leading force in the MS field for the past 40 years, and home to the largest MS clinic in North America – is determined to stop MS in its tracks. This summer, with a major investment from The Schroeder Foundation, it will take a giant step forward when it opens the BARLO MS Centre. St. Michael’s is set to become one of the world’s top centres for MS research, education and patient care.

At the BARLO MS Centre, patients will have access to an infusion innovation centre, an independent living lab where they can learn how to modify their homes, a gymnasium for customized exercise, physiotherapy and high-tech gait analysis, and counselling rooms where patients and their families receive the guidance to help them cope.

Most importantly, the BARLO MS Centre offers what patients need most: one-stop care. Patients no longer have to move from appointment to appointment, repeating their stories over and over again. Now, neurologists, nurses, social workers, neuropsychologists, physio and occupational therapists, and pharmacists will provide care for the patient’s body, mind and life – all in one place.

And because St. Michael’s is home to some of the world’s leading scientists, the BARLO MS Centre will accelerate breakthroughs into the causes and treatments of this intractable disease – and help the 2.8 million people living with MS around the world.

Donations can be made directly to: BARLO MS Centre – St. Michael Hospital (stmichaelsfoundation.com)

No more siloed medicine: The Schroeder BRAIN&HEART Centre at St. Michael’s is pushing the frontiers of integrated care.

The Schroeder Foundation has made a landmark investment of $22.125 million to establish The Schroeder BRAIN&HEART Centre at St. Michael’s Hospital, and usher in a new era of integrated precision medicine.

St. Michael’s is a pioneer in brain and heart care, with an impressive track record of national and world firsts in surgical innovation. The surgeons and physicians there are leaders in minimally-invasive, image-guided techniques, and they are giving people facing the toughest brain and heart challenges options for treatment they never had before, and enabling these patients to recover more quickly, with less pain, and less time spent in hospital. They are, quite simply, giving people back their quality of life – and saving lives.

The experts there also know that the conventional approach to treating brain, heart and vascular disorders as separate is outmoded. Brain and heart are interconnected – what happens in one often affects the other. The vision for The Schroeder BRAIN&HEART Centre is to create a hub for collaboration among these specialists that will revolutionize brain and heart care.

The Schroeder BRAIN&HEART Centre, led by renowned cardiac surgeon Dr. Mark Peterson, has been opening in phases, with full completion scheduled for the latter half of 2021. Funds from the Foundation are supporting the physical transformation of clinical spaces, including larger, state-of-the-art, technologically advanced catheterization labs and a multidisciplinary clinic, a one-stop shop for integrated and holistic care. But that’s not all. Three Schroeder research chairs – in advanced neurovascular interventions, in structural and valve intervention, and for the Centre’s director – will allow St. Michael’s to recruit and support trailblazing and rising star surgeon-scientists, giving them dedicated time to devise new ways of providing inventive, best-in-class care. And The Schroeder Institute for Cardiac and Aortic Surgery will design and test new coordinated care pathways for patients, and train surgical fellows in the range of open, endovascular and hybrid surgical techniques.

As the knowledge and expertise developed in Toronto will be shared around the world, The Schroeder BRAIN&HEART Centre promises to be a catalyst for health-care innovation on a global scale.

Donations can be made directly to: Brain & Heart Care – St. Michael’s Hospital Foundation (stmichaelsfoundation.com)

Campaign for the Walter and Maria Schroeder BRAIN&HEART Centre

Join our $42-million campaign so we can do what no one has done before. We’re creating a centre where the world’s top specialists treat the toughest brain and heart cases — together.

St. Michael’s will soon be Canada’s only hospital that takes an integrated approach to health care for the brain and heart – without the silos that get in the way of the best medicine.

Thanks to the remarkable $19.125-million gift from legendary Canadian philanthropists Walter and Maria Schroeder, we’re building the Walter and Maria Schroeder BRAIN&HEART Centre.

It’s based on the latest medical thinking that the separation between brain and heart is artificial. What happens to one very often impacts the other.

  • A brain aneurysm can stop a heart
  • A heart attack can cause a stroke
  • Degenerative brain diseases like Alzheimer’s share a genetic link with heart disease
  • Though some diseases may show up in only one area, they still affect both the brain and heart

So why are the brain and the heart treated separately?

At St. Michael’s Hospital, they’re not. Unlike other hospitals in Canada, our brain and heart specialists work together to treat patients, and to invent medical tools and procedures that are best for both organs.

When it’s completed, The Walter and Maria Schroeder BRAIN&HEART Centre will have state-of-the-art facilities and equipment, and a space dedicated entirely to medical discovery and invention.

For the first time, care will be structured around the patient – not medicine.

Our campaign is 85 per cent completed. Please help us finish our new centre and lead the brain and heart revolution.

In-Home Dementia Intervention, a program under the direction of Dr. Robin Green and Dr. Kathy McGilton at Toronto Rehab.

The Schroeder Brain Institute will help to deliver new and innovative clinical approaches through the use of artificial intelligence, smart home systems, advanced sensors and robotics in rehabilitation. For patients with dementia, whose progression may be rapid or measured, this adaptability is essential. The Brain Institute will also test the efficacy of smart home systems and advanced sensors to help predict how these therapies may be adapted over time.

Beyond these existing initiatives, the Institute’s national reputation as a nexus for health innovation will create a wealth of opportunities moving forward. To build Canada’s pipeline of health innovators, The Schroeder Brain Institute will also create and implement health innovation education and leadership programs. These programs will be delivered through a variety of vehicles, including interdisciplinary university undergraduate and graduate classes, presentations for health-system leaders and online webinars reaching stakeholders across the country.

Donor to subsidize milk program cut by school division

Donor to subsidize milk program cut by school division

 

Winnipeg Free Press

Posted: 4:00 AM CDT Saturday, Mar. 20, 2021

A city philanthropist will serve up a $210,000 donation to restore a milk-subsidy program drained from Winnipeg School Division’s budget this month.

“The cut demonstrates a total disregard for the division’s most vulnerable students,” Walter Schroeder said in a news release Friday. “Instead of making cuts from the top, the division has chosen to cut a program that directly affects the well-being of children and youth.”

The $210,000 donation from the Schroeder Foundation will restore the subsidy program, which provides 650-ml cartons of milk to elementary and junior high students for 25 cents. The subsidy was eliminated on March 9 when the division announced its 2021-22 budget.

Schroeder, who grew up in Winnipeg and attended Dufferin School, said the issue of food security in the city’s poorest neighbourhoods is close to his heart, and he recalled school milk deliveries where students would pay a nickel for a pint of milk.

“I remember the clink of glass bottles, the deliveries from the milkman, the importance of fresh milk to growing kids. My mother would give me a nickel to pay for the milk, but I could see not everyone received some,” he said.

“There were families even poorer than ours. The truth is, you can’t learn if you’re hungry. Subsidies like these go a long way in supplementing a child’s diet and helping families who want the best for their kids.”

Schroeder founded the Dominion Bond Rating Service, then sold the company in 2014, allowing him to focus on philanthropy.

His charitable foundation funds a wide variety of initiatives in Winnipeg, and throughout Canada, aimed at providing nutritious food for families and educational opportunities for disadvantaged youth.

It operates a food bank at St. John’s High School in the North End, which typically delivers 100 food hampers to the families of students in need, a number that soared to 170 in the early days of the pandemic.

At St. John’s, the foundation has not only funded the food bank — buying groceries from Downtown Family Foods — but provided bursaries, scholarships and a state-of-the-art cafeteria that provides free breakfasts and nutritious lunches that cost a maximum of $2.50.

It currently provides more than 700 scholarships and bursaries, as well as equipment and other supports to students at three Winnipeg high schools, with donations totaling more than $3 million annually.

The news release said Schroeder became aware of food insecurity at St. John’s during a visit in 2018 when he saw teachers buying granola bars and apples out of their own pocket for hungry students.

“He decided to buy these items for students through the foundation and, throughout the years, has taken this offer much further,” it said, noting the foundation will provide 40 full, four-year scholarships for high school students to the University of Manitoba and 40 to Red River College this year.

Dementia Rehab, the Schroeder Brain Institute will target specific areas of rehabilitation

Dementia Rehab, a program under the direction of Dr. Alex Mihailidis, Dr. Andrea Iaboni and Dr. Kathy McGilton at Toronto Rehab.

The Schroeder Brain Institute will target specific areas of rehabilitation, which include activities of daily living, language and communication, social interaction, behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, pain and physical disability. It is a fundamentally optimistic approach to dementia care that enables patients to thrive within their respective environments.

Advancing Innovation through the Centre for Neurotechnological Innovation to Application (“CRANIA”)

Advancing Innovation through the Centre for Neurotechnological Innovation to Application (“CRANIA”), a program under the direction of Dr. Milos Popovic at Toronto Rehab, and Dr. Taufik Valiante at Toronto Western Hospital.

The aim for CRANIA is to be the recognized leader in an exciting new field of medicine that restores or improves patients’ function by correcting abnormal electrical or chemical activity in the brain. More specifically, CRANIA’s contribution to The Schroeder Brain Institute will be to engineer brain-computer interfaces and other technological tools that can restore neural networks and improve function for many neurological disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease, epilepsy and stroke, to name a few.

Under the leadership of Dr. Alex Mihailidis, CRANIA will also develop technologies to support Dementia Rehab and In-Home Dementia Intervention (See Programs B and C below) at Toronto Rehab. These technologies will include advanced robotics, wearable and environmental instrumentation, and other technologies using artificial intelligence.

15 Sisler students surprised with full scholarships to Vancouver Film School

15 Sisler students surprised with full scholarships to Vancouver Film School

 

CBC News

February 23, 2021

Article by: Darren Bernhardt

Philanthropist Walter Schroeder is at it again, opening his wallet to help 15 inner-city Winnipeg students head to the to Vancouver Film School on full-ride scholarships.

“No way,” was blurted out by more than a few of the students, from Sisler High School’s CREATE post-grad program, when the surprise announcement was made during a live-streamed video conference on Tuesday.

 

Creation of the Schroeder Allergy and Immunology Research Institute

The proposed terms of reference for the Schroeder Allergy and Immunology Research Institute will be as follows:

Established in 2020 by the Walter and Maria Schroeder Foundation. To be used to establish the Schroeder Allergy and Immunology Research Institute, which will seek to mitigate allergy by amplifying and enabling research that will provide evidence-based approaches to address the causes and impact of allergy. Expenditures from the Fund will be guided at the discretion of the Director of the Schroeder Allergy and Immunology Research Institute.

The Schroeder Allergy and Immunology Research Institute will consist of various initiatives including, but not limited to, the Schroeder Chair in Allergy and Immunology Research, the Schroeder Allergy and Immunology Research Institute Scholars, the Schroeder Allergy and Immunology Fellows in Bioinformatics and operations and research support for the Treatment and Prevention Pathways, including the CHILD Study.