The Importance of Philanthropy in Healthcare

The recent introduction of virtual care, healthcare data management, and exploration of robotics, three-dimensional printing, nanotechnology and various connected devices into Canada’s healthcare system has allowed for tremendous strides in the delivery of care.

These advancements are not possible without private philanthropic contributions to the healthcare system. While the federal government supports the system with provincial transfer payments for healthcare, the system is largely reliant on these gifts.

This goes beyond purchasing new equipment and constructing new buildings. 

Many Canadians are unaware of the fact that, in Canada, the salaries of scientists that support research and innovation come from philanthropy. There are few government-funded positions as scientists, and oftentimes, projects are not eligible to apply for operating grants unless the can demonstrate the full-time employment of a scientist. 

In order to be innovative and maintain a system that can support the complex needs of Canadians, philanthropy must exist. The Walter & Maria Schroeder Foundation has contributed to this system but cannot bear the weight alone – Canadians must step up and provide philanthropic support to the system we rely so heavily upon.

CRANIA Project Leads Charge in Canadian Medical Research

On May 15th, the Center for Advancing Neurotechnological Innovation for Application (CRANIA) was launched as a joint initiative between the University Health Network (UHN) and the University of Toronto (UofT). The CRANIA project focuses on research and solutions for medical conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, depression and more. 

The CRANIA project came to life when the Walter & Maria Schroeder Foundation gifted the Toronto Rehab Foundation $20 million establishing the Walter & Maria Schroeder Institute for Brain Innovation & Recovery to research innovative solutions for brain disorders. 

The CRANIA project centers around Neuromodulation, a rapidly progressing medical practice involving the use of sophisticated devices that can be implanted on a patient’s brain, spinal cord or peripheral nerves. These devices regulate neuronal activity to help alleviate symptoms associated with these diseases. CRANIA involves a unique team of researchers, computer scientists, engineers, mathematicians and physicians all working together under the center’s initiatives. 

CRANIA’s diverse team is utilizing the innovative and advanced technology to better map how these diseases affect a person’s brain. Through their efforts, symptoms of these terrible diseases can be better assessed and treated than ever before.